It Matters, Even When We Think It Does Not, Part II

I wrote a post on Instagram about a movement in the young Diaspora that a lot of people, especially those doing the work, showed love to (that is, appreciated). It was such an honor to be acknowledged in that way. I wish more people would receive these tokens of validation for their work. But even when they/we do not, it is important that we continue the pursuit.

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The One Thing I Wish My African Friends Understood About Black Lives Matter

The period of the 1950s and 60s was a vibrant one for Africa and African Americans. During both the Independence Struggle in Africa and the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S., the two groups collaborated, with leaders visiting and seeking council and perspective from each other. We don't see that same level of collaboration for today's social movements, especially Black Lives Matter. This might explain why. 

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The Best Thing I Did Was Keep My Dreams To Myself

Ghanaian trotros (minivans used for transport or the equivalent of the dollar vans in Brooklyn) are notorious for highlighting some of the funniest and insightful idioms in our culture. This idiom in particular is my favorite: "observers are worried". Observers are worried means onlookers are worried, usually haters, because they see your success but do not know the source. I kept it that way. 

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The Future Has An Ancient Heart: Why I Moved To Ghana

Many people assume that the decision to move is a one time realization; that is, you are sitting at a bar somewhere in Lower Manhattan or East London and out of no where, you realize that your life has little meaning, so you buy a ticket and move to "Africa" the next month. I share my experience of how many positive experiences on the continent made staying in Ghana less of a decision and more a natural next step. 

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